Your Olive Oil could be Fake

Olive oil fraud is a major concern in the industry, and it can be unnerving to think that you may not be getting what you paid for. Although Olive oil is a staple in many households, many people are aware of how to differentiate real and fake olive oil - and how can we? This article will provide you with tips on how to tell if your olive oil is real or fake.

Where is it produced?

Authentic olive oil is usually produced in a specific location, typically the Mediterranean. If the production location is outside that area, it could be a red flag that what you are buying is fake. Verify the location by checking the label and researching the brand to ensure that they have a legitimate presence in the region.

black-olives-on-branches-after-the-rain

 

Read the Label

The label of a real olive oil bottle should have additional information, including the origin, harvest date, and processing date. A genuine olive oil bottle typically presents that information with pride because it is how consumers can check its quality independently. Furthermore, here are some terms to look for when reading the label: “extra-virgin,” “cold-pressed,” and “first cold-pressed” are indications that the oil is a high-grade product. One more thing, if it says "Olive Pomace Oil", AVOID it at all costs. It isn't really Olive oil at all! Here's why.

olive-oil-poured-on-marble-kitchen-countertop

Check the Bottle

Real olive oil comes in dark-colored bottles to protect the oil from light. Light exposure can make the oil less potent and less flavorful. Moreover, if the container is transparent or has had a history of exposure to heat, it is likely that the oil is no longer authentic.

Taste It

The most reliable test to determine if olive oil is authentic is by tasting it. Fake olive oil has a neutral flavor since it is refined with other lower-quality oils. On the other hand, real olive oil has a distinct and robust taste of dominant fruitiness, bitterness, and spiciness. To do the taste test, pour a small amount or about a spoonful of the oil into a separate dish and then taste it. If the oil is rancid, it may taste old or stale. Real and good olive oil is the kind you would want to pour over everything and dunk (more so than dip) your sourdough in. 

Buy from a Reliable Source

It is essential to buy from a reliable source, whether offline or online. If you can’t buy from a trusted farmer, olive oil specialty store, or manufacturer, go for a reputable supermarket. Local farm shops and farmers' markets are also a good choice as they often stock locally produced, high-quality olive oil.

Now that you have learned how to tell if your olive oil is real or fake, don't take chances with low-quality olive oil. You deserve to enjoy genuine olive oil and all its benefits. Low-quality or fake olive oil isn't really olive oil at all. Ensure you research the production location, read the label, check the bottle, taste-test the oil if you can, and buy from a reliable source. With this knowledge, you can confidently buy authentic olive oil for your family. Happy cooking and eating!

Other posts

  • Taming the Monkey Mind: A Guide to Inner Peace

    Taming the Monkey Mind: A Guide to Inner Peace

    Ever felt like your mind is swinging from one thought to another, resembling the mischievous antics of a monkey? If so, you're well acquainted with what's known as the Monkey Mind. This relentless mental chatter, leaping from branch to branch...

  • 5 Celebrities who swear by EVOO and the reasons why

    While it's common knowledge that Extra Virgin Olive Oil is a nutrient-packed, delightful substitute for butter and healthy fat beloved by celebrities, the real revelation is understanding the compelling reasons why these A-listers are discreetly obsessed with infusing this golden...

  • Feeling tired? You could be Low on Salt

    Feeling tired? You could be Low on Salt

    We've all seen Salt Bae RAINING salt all over steaks in front of awestruck customers. Sure, it might taste good, but all that salt actually good for you? Interestingly, although salt is often portrayed as a villain, did you know that it is actually...